A Teacher's Guide To The Exhibit for Grades K-8 -- San Diego Natural History Museum -- Environmental Science Education Center

Logo for The Dinosaurs of Jurassic Park: The Lost World

Introduction

Exhibit Highlights

Dinosaur Unit Outline and Standards Correlations

Dinosaur Background

Dinosaurs in the Exhibit

Dinosaurs and Southern California

Vocabulary

Pre-visit Activities

Museum Visit Worksheet A

Museum Visit Worksheet B

Post-visit Activities

Answers

References

The Dinosaurs of Jurassic Park:
The Lost World Exhibit

Where Do They Come From

Dinosaurs lived all across the Earth. However, their fossils are not found everywhere. Seas, plants, buildings, and layers of rock now cover over the rock containing dinosaur fossils. But some places, where dinosaur-aged rock shows on the surface of the Earth, produce many dinosaur skeletons. Different places expose different dinosaurs and times in dinosaur life. Around the world, new kinds of dinosaurs are now being discovered at a record rate-a new kind every six weeks!

The Dinosaurs of Jurassic Park: The Lost World presents casts of many new kinds of dinosaurs from around the world. They are listed below by the time periods in which they lived.

The Triassic Period

The earliest dinosaurs from the Triassic Period are best known from northwestern Argentina and the southwestern United States.

Herrerasaurus, Argentina, 228 million years ago, 9 feet long
Eoraptor, Argentina, 228 million years ago, 4 feet long
Coelophysis, U.S., 210 million years ago, 6 feet long
Plateosaurus, Germany, 210 million years ago, 18 feet long

The Jurassic Period

Dinosaurs from the middle of the Jurassic Period are known most from south-central China. From the end of the Jurassic Period we know dinosaurs well from the American West.

Dilophosaurus, Arizona and China, meat-eater, 190 million years ago, 20 feet long
Bellusaurus, China, sauropod, plant-eater, 170 million years ago, 10 feet long
Monolophososaurus, China, meat-eater, 160 million years ago, 30 feet long
Tuojiangosaurus, China, stegosaur plant-eater, 160 million years ago, 15 feet long
Allosaurus, U.S., meat-eater, 145 million years ago, 15 feet long (juvenile)
Camarasaurus, U.S., sauropod plant-eater, 145 million years ago, 20 feet long (juvenile)
Compsognathus, Germany, meat-eater, 145 million years ago, 5 feet long

The Cretaceous Period

Dinosaurs from the last dinosaur period are known from many places as well. Argentina, Mongolia, the United States, and Canada are particularly rich in Cretaceous dinosaurs.

Giganotosaurus, Argentina, meat-eater, 100 million years ago, 41 feet long
Tarbosaurus, Mongolia, meat-eater, 70 million years ago, 28 feet long
Albertosaurus, North America, meat-eater, 75 million years ago, 20 feet long (juvenile)
Thescelosaurus, North America, plant-eater, 75 million years ago, 10 feet long
Stegoceras, North America, pachycephalosaur plant-eater, 70 million years ago, 6 feet long

The Dinosaurs of Jurassic Park: The Lost World was produced by Dinosaur Exhibitions, LLC, under the direction of "Dino" Don Lessem, and in partnership with Universal Studios and Amblin Entertainment. The exhibition was designed by Museum Design Associates. Jurassic Park and Lost World are trademarks of Universal City Studios and Amblin Entertainment.

Teacher's Guide | Dinosaurs of the Jurassic Park | Exhibits